© 2019 Barbara Jacobs for IAFP

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By Gregorio Kohon

Published in association with the Institute of Psychoanalysis

Series: The New Library of Psychoanalysis

In his new book, Considering the Nature of Psychoanalysis: The Persistence of a Paradoxical Discourse, Gregorio Kohon describes the complexity of the psychoanalytic encounter, questioning the misguided attempts to simplify and/or reduce it to either art or science.

 

Kohon disputes the contemporary use of parameters offered by evidence-based medicine as a research model to study psychoanalysis. Instead, he proposes to reconsider the relevance of the psychoanalytic single case study, its importance and pre-eminence.

 

The present book will be of great interest to all psychotherapists, councillors, psychiatrists, mental health workers and students and academics of the social sciences.

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by Tilman Kluttig and Bandy X. Lee. Prologue by Estela Welldon. Epilogue by James Gilligan. John Adlam (Editor)

This is a provocative collection exploring the different types of violence and how they relate to one another, examined through the integration of several disciplines, including forensic psychotherapy, psychiatry, sociology, psychosocial studies and political science. By examining the 'violent states' of mind behind specific forms of violence and the social and societal contexts in which an individual act of human violence takes place, the contributors reveal the dynamic forces and reasoning behind specific forms of violence including structural violence, and conceptualise the societal structures themselves as 'violent states'.

Other research often stops short at examining the causes and risk factors for violence, without considering the opposite states that may not only mitigate, but allow for a different unfolding of individual and societal evolution. As a potential antidote to violence, the authors prescribe an understanding of these 'creative states' with their psychological origins, and their importance in human behaviour and meaning-seeking. Making a call to move beyond merely mitigating violence to the opposite direction of fostering creative potential, this book is foundational in its capacity to cultivate social consciousness and effect positive change in areas of governance, policy-making, and collective responsibility.

This two-volume set includes:

Volume 1: Structural Violence and Creative Structures ISBN 9781785925641

Volume 2: Human Violence and Creative Humanity ISBN 9781785925658

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Edited by Colin Campbell and Jackie Craissati

The UK Government's Offender Personality Disorder (OPD) Strategy is one of the most significant developments in mental health and criminal justice in recent years. The challenges presented by personality disorder offenders are not unique to the UK and this book also provides a useful overview of developments in the UK for those working with this population in countries where health service provision and legal frameworks pose different challenges.

Managing Personality Disordered Offenders: A Pathways Approach describes how the OPD Strategy has been implemented by a consortium of mental health trusts in the UK, in collaboration with the National Probation Service and the Prison Service. This volume covers the broad range of key tasks in developing and delivering an OPD service. This includes reviewing the political and clinical context and how it aims to address some of the criticisms levelled at previous initiatives developed to
meet the needs of this population. In each chapter, the authors review the existing literature and discuss the various options that were considered during the development of each of the services. Through this lens, the reader gains a better understanding of the direction taken, followed by a detailed,
practical "how to do it" guide.

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Edited by Brett Kahr

New Horizons in Forensic Psychotherapy: Exploring the Work of Estela V. Welldon, edited by the author, contains many rich contributions by some of Welldon's most distinguished former students and proteges. The book consists of important chapters on the creative ways in which colleagues have utilised and expanded upon Welldon's work in the field of forensic psychotherapy in a variety of settings, including in hospitals, prisons, community mental health clinics, and, also, in private practice.

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Edited by Angela Foster

Mothers Accused and Abused: Addressing Complex Psychological Needs brings together stories about mothers who are accused of harming, and in some cases killing, their children, children who subsequently harm or kill others and the challenges to professionals who work with them.

Contributors consider the deeply rooted cycles of neglect and abuse manifested in the childhoods of mothers, who only come to our attention when their extreme distress is expressed through their actions. By recognising the long-standing, unmet dependency needs of abused and neglected women, the book argues that longer term engagement can prevent a seemingly endless repetition of court hearings and imprisonment, and thereby address cycles of neglect.

 

With sections on mothers in prison and interventions following child care proceedings, Mothers Accused and Abused will be a valuable resource to those working in the criminal and civil justice systems, social work and mental health as well as others who, in a professional or personal capacity, encounter troubled mothers and their children.

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By: Jessica Collier (Editor), Pamela Windham Stewart (Editor)

HMP Holloway was the largest women's prison in Europe, historically holding numerous infamous female criminals and eliciting intrigue and fascination from the public. The End of the Sentence: Psychotherapy with Female Offenders documents the rich and varied psychotherapeutic work undertaken by dedicated specialists in this intense and often difficult environment, where attempts to provide psychological security were often undermined by conflicting ideas of physical security. Women commit crime most often in the context of poverty, addiction and transgenerational violence or trauma, familial cycles of offending and imprisonment which are often overlooked. Using personal testimony and case studies, and screened through the lens of psychoanalytic theory, the book examines the enduring therapeutic and relational endeavour to find connection, closure and to experience a "good enough" ending with prisoners when the possibility of a positive new beginning often seemed remote. It also considers how the cultural and political discourse remains hostile towards women who are incarcerated, and how this may have culminated in the closure of the only female prison in London. Through insightful real-life accounts, this insightful book also emphasizes the importance of professionals finding ways of supporting one another to offer women who have entered the criminal justice system a way to leave it. It will prove fascinating reading for forensic psychotherapists, forensic psychologists and criminologists, as well as anything interested in the criminal justice system.